Patreon Exclusive: So, Let’s Talk About That Sign “O” the Times Reissue

Patreon Exclusive: So, Let’s Talk About That Sign “O” the Times Reissue

(Featured Image: Cover art for the forthcoming Sign “O” the Times Super Deluxe Edition; photo by Jeff Katz, © Warner Bros./NPG Records.)

Last Thursday, after weeks of rumors and leaks, it finally became official: the next expanded reissue from Warner Bros. and the Prince Estate is Sign “O” the Times, and it’s a doozy: 8 CDs (13 LPs, for the wax-inclined) and a DVD covering the full breadth of Prince’s output from late 1985 to early 1987. I won’t be “officially” writing about this music until 2021 at the earliest (more on that later), but damned if I can’t share some preliminary thoughts about it now. Supporters on Patreon can read them now, disc by disc (and, in the case of the Vault discs, track by track):

Patreon Exclusive: “So, Let’s Talk About That Sign ‘O’ the Times Reissue”

Meanwhile, while I have you here, let me share that I am reasonably confident that the blog relaunch I’ve been working on will be ready by next week. This means, among other things, a return to regular posts in July. Thank you all for your patience during my extended leave of absence; I’ll have more to say next week, but for now, I’m excited to be back!

This Weekend: Dirty Mind 40 Graffiti Bridge 30 Virtual Symposium

This Weekend: Dirty Mind 40 Graffiti Bridge 30 Virtual Symposium

So, uh, it’s been a while. I know I haven’t looked it, but I’ve actually been relatively busy these past few weeks, preparing to relaunch d / m / s / r for its fifth year and beyond. It has been slow, tedious work, but it’s looking great and I think will overall be a much better reading experience. I can’t wait to share it later this month.

In the meantime, I wanted to make sure you all know about this weekend’s virtual symposium celebrating 40 years of Dirty Mind and 30 years of Graffiti Bridge. This will be the third Prince-focused symposium organized by De Angela Duff (of New York University and the Grown Folks Music podcast network), who previously put together the wonderful symposia on the 30th anniversaries of Lovesexy in 2018 and Batman in 2019. I am honored to be a small part of this year’s event (which is being held remotely due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic), along with friends of d / m / s / r Darling Nisi, Harold Pride, Erica Thompson, Karen Turman, and Chris Aguilar Garcia, and a bunch of other people who I have either had the pleasure to meet or have long admired from afar. If you’re interested in seeing me specifically, I will be on a roundtable on Sunday at 5:30 p.m. with KaNisa and podcasters Michael Dean, Ivan Orr, and Ricky Wyatt, discussing the Time’s Pandemonium album. But really, you should just check out the whole thing. The event is free, and now that it’s held virtually, you don’t need to travel to Brooklyn to join us (hell, you don’t even need to put on pants!).

You can view the symposium schedule and register to attend here:

Prince DM40GB30 Virtual Symposium

Thank you so much to De Angela for extending the invitation to participate; I’ve been a fan of her work for a while and just waiting for the opportunity to connect. Can’t wait to see everyone this weekend!

Loving Prince Means Believing Black Lives Matter

Loving Prince Means Believing Black Lives Matter

(Featured Image: Uptown, Minneapolis May 31, 2020; photo stolen from Sara Savoy’s Twitter.)

I wasn’t sure if I wanted to write about the uprisings against police brutality currently going on in the United States and elsewhere; to be honest, it feels a little self-aggrandizing to insert myself into the conversation. But for better or worse, d / m / s / r is the biggest platform I have, and I would be remiss if I didn’t use it to add my voice to those calling for justice and long-overdue, radical change.

Believing that Black lives matter is the only reasonable or appropriate position for a blog about Prince to take. Prince was a Black man who centered his Blackness in every aspect of his life and work. He was famously a major financial contributor to the Black Lives Matter organization before his death in 2016; he used his platform as a presenter at the 2015 Grammy Awards to shout out the movement; and after the murder of Freddie Gray by Baltimore police officers that same year, he wrote the song “Baltimore” and organized a benefit concert to help heal the city after days of unrest. According to cowriter Dan Piepenbring, he wanted his unfinished memoir to “solve racism.”

All of this indicates a shift, late in his life, to overt political activism; but even at the height of his crossover success, he was already trying to imagine a better world for Black people. “Uptown” is a vision of racial unity, set in a city whose history often does not live up to its inclusive reputation. “America” is a Hendrix-esque reappropriation of “America the Beautiful” with sardonic new lyrics about inner-city desperation. Even “The Cross” draws from the long African American spiritual tradition of using scripture to advocate for liberation. And this isn’t even to mention the litany of songs released later in his career that are even more forthright in addressing racism: from “The Sacrifice of Victor” to “We March,” from “Dreamer” to “Black Muse.”

As a rule, I try to avoid speculating on what Prince would have thought or done had his time on Earth not come to an end four years ago. But I am confident that, had he lived to witness the police killings of Philando Castile in July 2016 and George Floyd last month–not to mention the countless other acts of police brutality, fatal or otherwise, against Black people in the Twin Cities and elsewhere–he would have been fully in support of these protests. And, while I am also usually not one to say that we should do or believe everything that Prince did, in this instance, I can’t think of a more productive way to honor his memory.

But enough from me. I’d like to take this opportunity to share some critical perspectives on Prince from Black writers and podcasters. Please feel free to share more in the comments:

Also, please consider donating to these or other resources supporting the struggle for Black lives in Minneapolis. If nothing else, this is something we know that Prince would have done:

In lieu of suspending Patreon payments this month, I will be donating all patron fees to the above organizations. Thanks for reading, take care of yourselves, and I’ll be back at a time when it feels appropriate.

Press Rewind: “When Doves Cry”

Press Rewind: “When Doves Cry”

(Featured Image: Prince practices social distancing sans the Revolution during the “When Doves Cry” music video shoot, 1984; photo by Larry Williams.)

As we all continue to figure out how the hell we’re supposed to get through this quarantine with some level of normalcy, please feel free to spend a little over an hour with me and Jason Breininger (not in the same room, thankfully) as we go in-depth on “When Doves Cry” for his Press Rewind podcast:

Press Rewind: “When Doves Cry”

Listening back, it strikes me how much these lyrics are about touching and other forms of physical intimacy, and how wildly different those concepts sound today than they did 36 years (or two weeks) ago. May we all look forward to a day when “the sweat of your body covers me” conjures images of more than just COVID-19-spreading droplets. In the meantime, stay safe (and stay home).